Reasons To Ditch Windows For Linux

Linux, sometimes referred to by the press as ‘Windows NT’s worst enemy’. Wired Magazine once called it ‘The greatest story never told’. This is a perfect definition because the story behind Linux is indeed a great one, yet it is unknown to so many people.
Let’s start at the beginning.

Back when ‘Stayin’ Alive’ was still topping the charts, and Microsoft was a spec in the world of computers, AT&T produced a multi-user operating system and labeled it ‘UNIX’. Throughout the years, UNIX caught on and many different versions of it began to come out. A popular one, called ‘Minix’ (mini-UNIX) was available for use at The University of Helsinki in Finland. A student at the University named Linus Torvalds believed he could create an operating system superior to Minix. In 1991 he started his new operating system as a side project, but it soon developed into a full-time hobby until 1994 when the first official version of the operating system was released.

Linux is Easier than Windows – Even your grandma should use it!

You’re probably now saying ‘so what’s the big deal about Linux? Isn’t it just another operating system?’ Absolutely not! First of all, Linux is released under something called ‘open source license’. Open source is really more of an idea than a thing. Linux is released with all the source code and files that it was made with. This means a few things. Anyone who is good at programming can mess with the Linux code and release his own version of it. This also means that even though if you buy Linux in a store it will cost money, you’re not paying for the actual Linux itself. Your money goes to the price of packaging, the extra software that comes with the operating system, and technical support. The second, and most important reason that Linux is a big deal is because it’s a much more stable operating system than Windows. It runs on any system; even bottom of the line 386’s from before Linux even came out. Programs running under Linux almost never crash, and in the off chance that one does because of bad programming by the program author, it will not take the operating system down with it. Another important reason Linux is good is that it is secure. It is much harder to bring down by a hacker than Windows is. This is just an extremely short list of the reasons why Linux is so great. For further reading check out.

Today Linux can stand toe-to-toe with the best that Microsoft has to offer and there are at least five reasons to make the switch. In addition to the five below, Linux runs on fewer machines and therefore ends up with fewer viruses and malware as compared to Windows.

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Linux distributions in Day-to-Day Life

There are a few terms that may confuse Linux beginners. The first thing is its name, Linux vs GNU/Linux, the term Linux refers to the Linux kernel only. In reality many users refer to Linux as the operating system as a whole, the kernel plus libraries and tools. Also the term Linux is used to include all the programs that run on Linux, or that are available for this great operating system.
Furthermore, the description GNU/Linux needs understanding. Linux distributions with this name prefix are fleshed out with GNU implementations of the system tools and programs. One such example is Debian GNU/Linux. The GNU project goes back to the initiative of Richard M. Stallman and his dream to develop a free UNIX system. Based on his experiences at MIT and the collaboration with other colleagues he choose to use free software that was already available to rewrite the tools he needed. This included the TeX typesetting system as well as X11 window system. He published the rewritten tools under the GPL license whenever possible to make his work available freely to everyone who was interested in it.

Popular Linux Distributions
Popular Linux Distributions

A Linux distribution is a collection of software packages that fit together. A distribution is maintained by a team of software developers. Each member of the team focuses on a different package of the distribution. Together as a team they ensure that the single software packages are up-to-date and do not conflict with the other packages of the same release of the distribution.
As of 2019 for Debian GNU/Linux 10, the distribution includes over 13,370 new packages, for a total of over 57,703 packages. A repository is a directory of packages with a certain purpose. Debian GNU/Linux sorts its packages according to the development state. The official repository is named stable and reflects the current release of stable packages. The other repositories are named testing and unstable, and work in the same way but do not count as official packages.
Typically a Linux distribution comprises of packages for a Linux kernel, a boot loader, GNU tools and libraries, a graphical desktop environment with a windows environment, as well as additional software like a web browser, an email client, databases and documentation. The software is provided in two ways; as the source code and as the compiled binary packages. This allows you to understand how the software is designed, to study it and to adjust it according to your personal needs.

Depending on the focus of the Linux distribution, it also contains packages for a specific purpose like network or forensic tools, scientific software for educational purposes, and multimedia applications.

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Build a virtual machine with VirtualBox in Linux

Virtualization is almost as old as our beloved integrated silicon chips.
At the beginning of the 1960s, there had been two major computing issues.
First, many individual mainframe models were bespoke, so incompatible.
The other stumbling block was that as integrated processors became more powerful, institutions wanted to implement flexible “timesharing” between multiple users.

VirtualBox 5.2 on Fedora

IBM dismissed this multi-user batch processing was definitely the future! But in 1963, it lost a large MIT contract to General Electric. Realising its huge mistake, IBM developed the general purpose S/360 architecture, which could be implemented on a wide range of compatible systems. In 1965, IBM released the S/360-76, the world’s first mainframe to support virtualisation. And the rest is very much history.

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Linux Speed Up! Get a faster boot-up, a swifter desktop and more responsive apps.

Everyone loves a speedy computer. In this section we’ll look at some essential tricks to speed up your computer. You don’t have to be an experienced campaigner to get more mileage out of your Linux box. There are some techniques that even new users can employ to trick their Linux distro to boot faster.

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Hey you! Why don't you try Linux?!

Hi my name is Anis! And I’m a full time Linux user and I know a lot about it. It’s a great system, does not spy on you, and makes it very difficult to get malware. In the past few years, it’s also become a great platform for gaming, too. Here’s the answers to a bunch of questions I usually hear about Linux from Windows users.
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Why Linux Distro's Are More Secured Than Any Other Operation Systems

Linux is an open source operating system where everyone can read the entire codes but still it is considered more secure as compared to the other operating systems. Linux has been extensively deployed in the tech market as many of the gadgets are Linux based and that is why more people are building trust on the Linux platform. To throw more light on why Linux has superior internet security capabilities, let us check out some of its security features.
Linux

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Ubuntu Security: The Wifi Passowords Are Stored In Clear Text, Outside The Users Home

A user has reported that the wifi passwords are not encrypted on Ubuntu systems, being stored in clear text in a folder outside the user’s home, (/etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/) making it accessible for unwanted users. After this issue has been reported, a Canonical developer has explained in the mailing lists that this is caused by the fact … Read more Ubuntu Security: The Wifi Passowords Are Stored In Clear Text, Outside The Users Home

Mark Shuttleworth "Alright, Alright. I'm sorry!"

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The Ubuntu issue is complex and hard to pinpoint exactly. I agree with Shuttleworth that the trademark response was blown completely out of proportion. However, I find some things about his apology confusing.
For example, why would Shuttleworth call fixubuntu.com a “sucks” site without even having the courtesy to mention it by name? The name sounds kind of derogatory.
I also should say that I don’t agree with Shuttleworth that vocal non-technical critics of software are wasting time. There’s at least one person behind every software project, and it shouldn’t be considered a bad thing to know about the people and circumstances outside the actual code. If anything, I’d think Shuttleworth would agree with that.
Lastly, it’s a bit peculiar that he didn’t address the elephant in the room: Why Ubuntu’s online search lenses aren’t disabled by default.

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Full Disk Encryption Using Ubuntu In Most Secure Mode With AES-XTS-PLAIN64

Full Disk Encryption (FDE) is one of the best ways you can ensure all of the private information on your laptop stays private in case it’s lost, seized, stolen, or if you choose to sell or give away your computer in the future. This feature has been built-in to many GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, for many years. But until the recent release of Ubuntu 12.10, it was hidden away in the “alternate” text-mode installer of Ubuntu that many non-technical users don’t even know exists.
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Unlike passwords, full disk encryption can make the contents of a drive inaccessible to a powerful attacker who has possession of your computer. FDE provides the opportunity to protect your data with military-grade encryption that can’t be compromised on a reasonable timeframe. At least, not by any currently-known means. The only way to access the files protected by full disk encryption is to obtain the encryption key.
AES-XTS provides the most secure mode of full disk encryption. Unfortunately, it’s not available by default in many Linux installation packages. Ubuntu’s “alternate” installation image provides other implementations like AES-CBC, but not aes-xts-plain or aes-xts-plain64. If aes-cbc is good enough for you, it’s been available in the Ubuntu alternate installer for quite some time. A thorough but dated guide outlining the process is available here.
By downloading an Ubuntu desktop installation image and doing a little initial setup, you can use aes-xts-plain64 on your system. Aes-xts-plain and aes-xts-plain64 both provide the same mode of operation, but you’ll need to use aes-xts-plain64 if you want to format a partition larger than 2TB. Also, it’s important to note that using very large block sizes for XTS mode could lead to security issues. Using 512 byte block sizes mitigates this issue.

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