Today’s the 24th first anniversary of 1st Linux kernel release.

Today’s the 24th first anniversary of 1st Linux kernel release. October 5th is the day when Linus Torvalds released the 1st Linux kernel.
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If you remember, back in August, we celebrated the birthday of Linux. August 25th is the day when Linus Torvalds first told the world that he was working on a project named Linux. However, the Linux community celebrates October 5th as another anniversary of Linux.
So, is Linux confused about its birthday just like Google? Well, October 5th is the day when Linus released the first kernel.
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Today, Linux is running the world and more companies are adopting it to run their systems.
On the occasion of Linux kernel birthday, The Linux Foundation shared some interesting facts about the same. Let’s take a look at them:
  • Version 0.01 of the Linux kernel had 10,239 lines of code.
  • Version 4.1, released in July 2015, has more than 19 million lines of code.
  • The current Linux kernel is the result of one of the largest collaborative projects ever attempted.
  • Nearly 12,000 developers from more than 1,200 companies have contributed to the Linux kernel since tracking began 10 years ago.
  • The rate of Linux development is unmatched. The average number of changes accepted into the kernel per hour is 7.71, which translates to 185 changes every day and nearly 1,300 per week.
  • As of last month, 115,013,302 total lines of source code were present in The Linux Foundation’s Collaborative Projects.
  • It would take a team of 1,356 developers over 30 years to recreate the code base in these projects.
  • The total economic value of this work is estimated at more than $5 billion.
These facts are taken from The Linux Foundation‘s anniversary post.

Do I need An antivirus in linux?

Afraid to answer a bit background knowledge is necessary first.

Viruses hardly exists any more. Programs that infect other executables, overwrite parts of them and/or add new code to them is not how malware spreads nowadays in most cases. In windows that distinction is not really necessary, windows users use the term “virus” to describe every form of malware (and user error, sorry, couldn’t resist 😉 ). But in Linux that distinction is important as virus scanners in Linux do exactly what the name says…they scan for viruses. They don’t protect you against attacks from websites in any form. And on top of that they hardly even scan for Linux viruses…there are only very few proof-of-concept Linux viruses at all. And due to people never installing anything themselves but always packages provided by the distro through the package manager there is almost no attack surface for traditional viruses…no spreading of .exe saying they are the most fancy screensaver or similar. So the Linux virus scanners actually mostly scan for windows viruses, for example in a mail server scanning email attachments before delivering the mails.

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Hey you! Why don’t you try Linux?!

Hi my name is Anis! And I’m a full time Linux user and I know a lot about it. It’s a great system, does not spy on you, and makes it very difficult to get malware. In the past few years, it’s also become a great platform for gaming, too. Here’s the answers to a bunch of questions I usually hear about Linux from Windows users.

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Why Linux Distro’s Are More Secured Than Any Other Operation Systems

Linux is an open source operating system where everyone can read the entire codes but still it is considered more secure as compared to the other operating systems. Linux has been extensively deployed in the tech market as many of the gadgets are Linux based and that is why more people are building trust on the Linux platform. To throw more light on why Linux has superior internet security capabilities, let us check out some of its security features.

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Free useful software for everyone.

Free as in beer, not free as in freedom – though some of it is both. I didn’t put trialware there, or things that require you to pay, to get certain features. You can use Ninite.com to install a lot of it automatically, without any toolbars and crap like that. I didn’t include things like Blender and Sketchup, as they are, in my opinion, very niche. If you need such software, I’d assume you would already know about it. Obviously most of it is for Windows, but a lot of it is multi-platform.

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Linux Tails 1.0.1 – preserving your privacy and anonymity

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About:

Tails is a live operating system, that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity, and helps you to:

* use the Internet anonymously and circumvent censorship;
* all connections to the Internet are forced to go through the Tor network;
* leave no trace on the computer you are using unless you ask it explicitly;
* use state-of-the-art cryptographic tools to encrypt your files, emails and instant messaging.

 

Home Doc: https://tails.boum.org/doc/index.en.html
Direct Download: http://dl.amnesia.boum.org/tails/stable/tails-i386-1.0.1/tails-i386-1.0.1.iso
Torrent: https://tails.boum.org/torrents/files/tails-i386-1.0.1.torrent

Enjoy!

Ubuntu Security: The Wifi Passowords Are Stored In Clear Text, Outside The Users Home

A user has reported that the wifi passwords are not encrypted on Ubuntu systems, being stored in clear text in a folder outside the user’s home, (/etc/NetworkManager/system-connections/) making it accessible for unwanted users.

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After this issue has been reported, a Canonical developer has explained in the mailing lists that this is caused by the fact that the “All users may connect to this network” option is enabled by default.

This issue has an easy fix, directly from the graphical user interface. All you have to do is: Open network indicator -> Edit connections -> Select network -> Click edit -> untick “All users may connect to this network.” from the general tab.

By doing this setting, the password will be stored in the user’s home and so, it will become unavailable for unwanted users. Also, encrypt your homedir, for better security.