Linux distributions in Day-to-Day Life

There are a few terms that may confuse Linux beginners. The first thing is its name, Linux vs GNU/Linux, the term Linux refers to the Linux kernel only. In reality many users refer to Linux as the operating system as a whole, the kernel plus libraries and tools. Also the term Linux is used to include all the programs that run on Linux, or that are available for this great operating system.
Furthermore, the description GNU/Linux needs understanding. Linux distributions with this name prefix are fleshed out with GNU implementations of the system tools and programs. One such example is Debian GNU/Linux. The GNU project goes back to the initiative of Richard M. Stallman and his dream to develop a free UNIX system. Based on his experiences at MIT and the collaboration with other colleagues he choose to use free software that was already available to rewrite the tools he needed. This included the TeX typesetting system as well as X11 window system. He published the rewritten tools under the GPL license whenever possible to make his work available freely to everyone who was interested in it.

Popular Linux Distributions
Popular Linux Distributions

A Linux distribution is a collection of software packages that fit together. A distribution is maintained by a team of software developers. Each member of the team focuses on a different package of the distribution. Together as a team they ensure that the single software packages are up-to-date and do not conflict with the other packages of the same release of the distribution.
As of 2019 for Debian GNU/Linux 10, the distribution includes over 13,370 new packages, for a total of over 57,703 packages. A repository is a directory of packages with a certain purpose. Debian GNU/Linux sorts its packages according to the development state. The official repository is named stable and reflects the current release of stable packages. The other repositories are named testing and unstable, and work in the same way but do not count as official packages.
Typically a Linux distribution comprises of packages for a Linux kernel, a boot loader, GNU tools and libraries, a graphical desktop environment with a windows environment, as well as additional software like a web browser, an email client, databases and documentation. The software is provided in two ways; as the source code and as the compiled binary packages. This allows you to understand how the software is designed, to study it and to adjust it according to your personal needs.

Depending on the focus of the Linux distribution, it also contains packages for a specific purpose like network or forensic tools, scientific software for educational purposes, and multimedia applications.

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Refreshing the /boot

Every three months once kernel team releasing new stable kernel which comes with new features, Improved Hardware & System Performance. At least monthly once we will get kernel patch/update from operating system for varies fix. For best practices, i would advice users to install all the updates regularly to make the system up and running without any issue.

And /boot partition sometimes needs a bit of that attention. If you enable automatic
updates, it will fill up with old kernels that you’ll probably never need. It also will stop
you from running dnf (Dandified Packaging Tool) to install or remove anything. If you find yourself in this
situation, you can use rpm to get around it. RPM is the higher-level package manager
in Red-Hat-based distributions, and it’s very useful when dnf has “broken”.

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Detect malicious traffic with MalTrail in Linux

Maltrail is a malicious traffic detection system, utilizing publicly available (black)lists containing malicious and/or generally suspicious trails, along with static trails compiled from various AV reports and custom user defined lists, where trail can be anything from domain name, URL, IP address or HTTP User-Agent header value (e.g. sqlmap for automatic SQL injection and database takeover tool). Also, it uses (optional) advanced heuristic mechanisms that can help in discovery of unknown threats (e.g. new malware).
Features

  • Uses multiple public blacklists (alientvault, autoshun, badips, sblam etc)
  • Has extensive static trails for identification (domain names, URLs, IPaddresses or User-Agent values)
  • Optional heuristic mechanisms for detection of unknown threats
  • Based on Traffic -> Sensor <-> Server <-> Client Architecture
  • Web reporting interface

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Build a virtual machine with VirtualBox in Linux

Virtualization is almost as old as our beloved integrated silicon chips.
At the beginning of the 1960s, there had been two major computing issues.
First, many individual mainframe models were bespoke, so incompatible.
The other stumbling block was that as integrated processors became more powerful, institutions wanted to implement flexible “timesharing” between multiple users.

VirtualBox 5.2 on Fedora

IBM dismissed this multi-user batch processing was definitely the future! But in 1963, it lost a large MIT contract to General Electric. Realising its huge mistake, IBM developed the general purpose S/360 architecture, which could be implemented on a wide range of compatible systems. In 1965, IBM released the S/360-76, the world’s first mainframe to support virtualisation. And the rest is very much history.

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Linux Speed Up! Get a faster boot-up, a swifter desktop and more responsive apps.

Everyone loves a speedy computer. In this section we’ll look at some essential tricks to speed up your computer. You don’t have to be an experienced campaigner to get more mileage out of your Linux box. There are some techniques that even new users can employ to trick their Linux distro to boot faster.

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Hey you! Why don't you try Linux?!

Hi my name is Anis! And I’m a full time Linux user and I know a lot about it. It’s a great system, does not spy on you, and makes it very difficult to get malware. In the past few years, it’s also become a great platform for gaming, too. Here’s the answers to a bunch of questions I usually hear about Linux from Windows users.
linux_distros_2013

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Why Linux Distro's Are More Secured Than Any Other Operation Systems

Linux is an open source operating system where everyone can read the entire codes but still it is considered more secure as compared to the other operating systems. Linux has been extensively deployed in the tech market as many of the gadgets are Linux based and that is why more people are building trust on the Linux platform. To throw more light on why Linux has superior internet security capabilities, let us check out some of its security features.
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Steam for Fedora is now available in RPMFusion!

The Steam package is now available in the RPMFusion repositories. It is currently in the updates-testing repository, but it can be installed anyway directly if you have the RPMFusion repositories enabled. http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/updates/testing/19/i386/ The package is currently 32 bit only, but it can be installed easily also on a 64 bit system. In fact, I’m currently … Read moreSteam for Fedora is now available in RPMFusion!