The #Tor Guide for Hidden Services And Staying #Anonymous

Thank you for viewing the guide. All the links I posted are safe for viewing, as I stated. Please remember to use Tor with caution. DO not use any of your identities or names. Make a new one if necessary.
Most child porn sites are openly advertised. Memorize the beginning of certains links to know where to go and where not to. Do not stray into a domain you do not recognize. Ask an Onionland community that you trust beforehand.

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Because location-hidden services do not use exit nodes, they are not subject to exit node eavesdropping.
You can NOT GET V& using Hidden Services because Hidden Services run internally and do not require exit nodes. The only people who have gotten sniffed are the people who downloaded a fake version of Tor. Anonymous sniffed who went to Loli City and Hard Candy and wrote down their real IPs. I just want to clear this up. All traffic inside the network is encrypted. If you use the clearnet, you are using exit nodes, and you can be subject to suffering an attack. Most clearnet providers are perfectly safe. The majority are run by really cool guys who just want to help you browse the web with liberty. Don’t be stupid in Onionland. You’re only as safe as you’re weakest link.
UPDATE: For further discussion on potential Tor exploits or security faults, read this: http://zw3crggtadila2sg.onion/imageboard/fbi/res/481.html. Use Tor to connect to it.

For a secure environment, use Tails or Liberte as an OS. They’re a variation of Linux and perfect for Tor browsing. Windows security is an oxymoron; if you must use it, download an anti-virus. I suggest Kaspersky. You can also get Keyscrambler Pro from 1337x.org. It’s a great tool to prevent keylogging.

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Full Disk Encryption Using Ubuntu In Most Secure Mode With AES-XTS-PLAIN64

Full Disk Encryption (FDE) is one of the best ways you can ensure all of the private information on your laptop stays private in case it’s lost, seized, stolen, or if you choose to sell or give away your computer in the future. This feature has been built-in to many GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, for many years. But until the recent release of Ubuntu 12.10, it was hidden away in the “alternate” text-mode installer of Ubuntu that many non-technical users don’t even know exists.
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Unlike passwords, full disk encryption can make the contents of a drive inaccessible to a powerful attacker who has possession of your computer. FDE provides the opportunity to protect your data with military-grade encryption that can’t be compromised on a reasonable timeframe. At least, not by any currently-known means. The only way to access the files protected by full disk encryption is to obtain the encryption key.
AES-XTS provides the most secure mode of full disk encryption. Unfortunately, it’s not available by default in many Linux installation packages. Ubuntu’s “alternate” installation image provides other implementations like AES-CBC, but not aes-xts-plain or aes-xts-plain64. If aes-cbc is good enough for you, it’s been available in the Ubuntu alternate installer for quite some time. A thorough but dated guide outlining the process is available here.
By downloading an Ubuntu desktop installation image and doing a little initial setup, you can use aes-xts-plain64 on your system. Aes-xts-plain and aes-xts-plain64 both provide the same mode of operation, but you’ll need to use aes-xts-plain64 if you want to format a partition larger than 2TB. Also, it’s important to note that using very large block sizes for XTS mode could lead to security issues. Using 512 byte block sizes mitigates this issue.

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