How To Make Internet Faster With 1.1.1.1 Privacy DNS Server

Cloudflare, a very well-known company launched 1.1.1.1, world’s fastest and privacy-focused secure DNS service that not only speeds up your internet connection but also makes it harder for ISPs to track your web history. Cloudflare public DNS resolvers, 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 (as alternate DNS server for redundancy), support both DNS-over-TLS and DNS-over-HTTPS to ensure maximum privacy.

Privacy is another major highlight. Cloudflare doesn’t just promise that it won’t use your browsing data to serve ads; it commits that it will never write the querying IP address (yours) to disk. Any logs that do exist will be deleted within 24 hours. And these claims aren’t just reassuring words on a website. Cloudflare has retained KPMG to audit its practices annually and produce a public report to confirm the company is delivering on its promises.

The 1.1.1.1 website has some setup guidance, with simple tutorials covering Windows, Mac, Android, iOS, Linux and routers. These are very generic – you get one set of instructions for all versions of Windows, for instance – but there are some pluses (IPv6 as well as IPv4 details) and you should be able to figure it out. Additionally, mobile users can use WARP which secures all of the phone’s internet traffic.

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How to make Firefox an essential tool for OSINT

Before start reading this blog post, and gain serious interests in extra privacy tweaks on Firefox. Many related addon’s & tweaks in this post are already mentioned in my older post about tweaks that will enhance your privacy on internet with Firefox.

Okey! What is OSINT? Right?!

OSINT is defined by wikipedia as:

“Open-source intelligence (OSINT) is intelligence collected from publicly available sources. In the intelligence community (IC), the term “open” refers to overt, publicly available sources (as opposed to covert or clandestine sources); it is not related to open-source software or public intelligence.” (source)

So let’s summon this as simple as possible, basically anything you can find on the internet. The key point for me about OSINT is that it only relates to information you can find for free. Having to pay to get access to information such as an API or raw data isn’t really OSINT material. I’m not saying that’s wrong or should be a reason not to use data from paid sources, it’s just not really OSINT in its trust form. Clear?! Let’s carry on!

The most vital application for the search methods that must be conducted  is within a web browser. Most Windows users settle for Internet Explorer or Edge, well. I do not recommend using those browsers for OSINT analysis. The Firefox browser has enhanced security and a feature called “add-ons” or “extensions”. These are small applications that work within the browser that perform a specific function. They will make searching and documentation much easier. I also use, and encourage others to use, the Chrome web browser when necessary. However, many of the extensions that I need are only compatible with Firefox. The following instructions apply to any versions of Firefox, including Windows, Mac, and Linux.

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Detect malicious traffic with MalTrail in Linux

Maltrail is a malicious traffic detection system, utilizing publicly available (black)lists containing malicious and/or generally suspicious trails, along with static trails compiled from various AV reports and custom user defined lists, where trail can be anything from domain name, URL, IP address or HTTP User-Agent header value (e.g. sqlmap for automatic SQL injection and database takeover tool). Also, it uses (optional) advanced heuristic mechanisms that can help in discovery of unknown threats (e.g. new malware).
Features

  • Uses multiple public blacklists (alientvault, autoshun, badips, sblam etc)
  • Has extensive static trails for identification (domain names, URLs, IPaddresses or User-Agent values)
  • Optional heuristic mechanisms for detection of unknown threats
  • Based on Traffic -> Sensor <-> Server <-> Client Architecture
  • Web reporting interface

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Build a virtual machine with VirtualBox in Linux

Virtualization is almost as old as our beloved integrated silicon chips.
At the beginning of the 1960s, there had been two major computing issues.
First, many individual mainframe models were bespoke, so incompatible.
The other stumbling block was that as integrated processors became more powerful, institutions wanted to implement flexible “timesharing” between multiple users.

VirtualBox 5.2 on Fedora

IBM dismissed this multi-user batch processing was definitely the future! But in 1963, it lost a large MIT contract to General Electric. Realising its huge mistake, IBM developed the general purpose S/360 architecture, which could be implemented on a wide range of compatible systems. In 1965, IBM released the S/360-76, the world’s first mainframe to support virtualisation. And the rest is very much history.

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Facebook gathers data for data mining operations used by data brokers

When it comes to mass spying, the best game in town is not CIA or any of the alphabet soup agencies. Private companies and data brokers have been doing data collection on a massive scale, and given their advanced statistical methods, this information can say a lot about a person. In fact, I’d say that what they have is better than what the alphabet soup has, and their data has a lot of implications.

facebook-privacy

This started when companies like Amazon realized that they can make a profit every step of the way: sell items to customers, sell customers’ data to data brokers. Data brokering has since become much bigger, and so the data collection methods have also become much more extensive. There are many ways to gather mass data, and these are just the ones I can think of off the top of my head: first, many websites straight up sell their data to brokers. This includes many online vendors, all kinds of popular sites (not all of them, but some of them), adult entertainment sites, you name it. If those sites do not sell data, dishonest brokers can and do embed tracking ads on sites that accept them, revealing a user’s entire browsing history. Then of course there are companies like Google, that sell user search histories.

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How to protect your privacy by blocking all annoying Spotify ads & analytics in Linux, OSX and Windows with hosts file.

Today I will show you how to easily block the servers hosting Spotify ads on your Linux/Mac or Windows machine with a hosts file. This will allow you to listen all day long on a free account without hearing a single ad + to protect yourself from Spotify selling your private data to highest bidder. This trick is very simple, legal and works great. Spotify may catch on and find some way to stop this from working but, as of today (23 August 2019) it works swimmingly.


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Blocking Ad Server

In order to remove those pesky ads, all we need to do is setup out hosts file to override the DNS for Spotify’s ad servers and redirect that traffic to our local machine. When the traffic hits out local machine the call will fail and the ad will be skipped. Follow the steps below to add the entries needed.

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Make your AdBlock invisible to most sites that require you to disable AdBlock.

The Anti-Adblock Killer Script has not been updated for quite a while now. Most sites can sniff it.
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Fortunately, there are a few alternatives. I have been using the uBlock Protector Extension (Chrome only) for the past month and it works flawlessly. It is also updated frequently.

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Stop & uninstall Windows Telemetry/Tracking

This has been going around on the ‘Net the past few days. It has been found that Windows 10 uploads data to its servers even when every “feature” and app that normally might be expected to do that is disabled/uninstalled. For example, even if you don’t use the Cortana voice-command feature or Bing search, stuff is still being uploaded to Microsoft servers related to this. And even when users choose to not participate in any sort of customer improvement options and disable any kind of tracking, it is still tracking and uploading things.
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Not only is this a big privacy issue, there is also a system performance issue, as extra CPU cycles must be run and disk and network activity must occur to process these telemetry-related tasks.
And it is also the case that Windows 8.1 and 7 also are now doing this. Microsoft has been adding all these telemetry and tracking aspects to them lately through Windows Update, making them closer to Windows 10.
The advice from many experts now is to not go near Windows 10. Do not install it. Retain your privacy and control over your systems.
Below are instructions for disabling the unwanted telemetry/tracking in Windows 7 and 8.1

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Do I need An antivirus in linux?

Afraid to answer a bit background knowledge is necessary first.
Viruses hardly exists any more. Programs that infect other executables, overwrite parts of them and/or add new code to them is not how malware spreads nowadays in most cases. In windows that distinction is not really necessary, windows users use the term “virus” to describe every form of malware (and user error, sorry, couldn’t resist 😉 ). But in Linux that distinction is important as virus scanners in Linux do exactly what the name says…they scan for viruses. They don’t protect you against attacks from websites in any form. And on top of that they hardly even scan for Linux viruses…there are only very few proof-of-concept Linux viruses at all. And due to people never installing anything themselves but always packages provided by the distro through the package manager there is almost no attack surface for traditional viruses…no spreading of .exe saying they are the most fancy screensaver or similar. So the Linux virus scanners actually mostly scan for windows viruses, for example in a mail server scanning email attachments before delivering the mails.

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