First #Twitter reported about #Bitcoin, how did #MtGox look 5 years ago and more

Today’s post is completely a “feel good” post.

Meaning, you probably won’t learn anything new from it, but it will make you feel good. As Bitcoin prices continue to roller-coaster endlessly I thought this would be a good time to look back at where Bitcoin was when it just started out.

Using the Internet’s “Wayback machine”, Google search and various tools to explore Bitcoin’s past

So what I did in order to travel back in time is use the Wayback machine which is basically an Internet archive to see how several of the biggest Bitcoin websites looked when they first started out. I also used advanced Google and Twitter search tool to find out what where the earliest mentions of Bitcoin online. So let’s start out by comparing the biggest site of them all Bitcoin.org.

Read moreFirst #Twitter reported about #Bitcoin, how did #MtGox look 5 years ago and more

Ultimate n00b guide to Bitcoin client installation and security/cold storage!

I previously submitted a thread which you can find here with a video tutorial to use the very robust Armory bitcoin client. But for this submission I will provide the instructions to use Electrum BTC client which provides “Instant on” (your client does not download the blockchain, it uses a remote server). This will show … Read moreUltimate n00b guide to Bitcoin client installation and security/cold storage!

What are the implications of the recently leaked draft of the TPP intellectual property rights chapter?

First it is a draft text. Negotiations like these go through dozens if not hundreds of draft texts. Each one can change things drastically – or just be updated punctuation. This could be one which has been tossed, or one which is about to be released as the official version. No way to know really … Read moreWhat are the implications of the recently leaked draft of the TPP intellectual property rights chapter?

Mark Shuttleworth "Alright, Alright. I'm sorry!"

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The Ubuntu issue is complex and hard to pinpoint exactly. I agree with Shuttleworth that the trademark response was blown completely out of proportion. However, I find some things about his apology confusing.
For example, why would Shuttleworth call fixubuntu.com a “sucks” site without even having the courtesy to mention it by name? The name sounds kind of derogatory.
I also should say that I don’t agree with Shuttleworth that vocal non-technical critics of software are wasting time. There’s at least one person behind every software project, and it shouldn’t be considered a bad thing to know about the people and circumstances outside the actual code. If anything, I’d think Shuttleworth would agree with that.
Lastly, it’s a bit peculiar that he didn’t address the elephant in the room: Why Ubuntu’s online search lenses aren’t disabled by default.

Read moreMark Shuttleworth "Alright, Alright. I'm sorry!"

Steam for Fedora is now available in RPMFusion!

The Steam package is now available in the RPMFusion repositories. It is currently in the updates-testing repository, but it can be installed anyway directly if you have the RPMFusion repositories enabled. http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/updates/testing/19/i386/ The package is currently 32 bit only, but it can be installed easily also on a 64 bit system. In fact, I’m currently … Read moreSteam for Fedora is now available in RPMFusion!

GUIDE: Which drivers to install when using an Nvidia, ATI or Intel video card on Ubuntu

This guide could be usefully in further future for newbies joining Linux distribution Ubuntu. Which could be allot since Steam is migrating focusing it’s gaming platforms to Linux.
I will divide this in several sections that try to address some concerns that we end users have when using this video cards. To make the text smaller and not have to repeat myself a lot I have created the following acronym:
ANI – When you read this it refers to any Ati/AMD, Nvidia or Intel Card.
The questions are found in this order:

  • 1. Can I use the latest ANI on an older version of Ubuntu?
  • 2. What is the difference between using the ANI driver from the official site, the one that comes by default with the system or the one that comes in the PPA repositories?
  • 3. What PPAs are recommended when using any ANI video card?
  • 4. How should I know which ANI package I should install?
  • 5. How to install an ANI driver?
  • 6. What is the difference between the different Proprietary Drivers?
  • 7. What common bugs are solved by using the latest ANI drivers?
  • 8. How to know if my ANI video card is supported in Ubuntu?
  • 9. My ANI video card does not install (Installation problems)

So the following are the top questions asked related to this video cards:

1. Can I use the latest ANI on an older version of Ubuntu?

Ubuntu 11.04 / Ubuntu 11.10
In 11.04 and 11.10, the latest video cards will not work properly using the default drivers. If the video card appeared several months after the release of Ubuntu 11.04 or 11.10, the default drivers will probably not have support. It might be necessary to do an upgrade/update of the system or even add a PPA that gives support for current and future video cards for this versions of Ubuntu.
For example, in the case of the GTX 560, it gained support with the Nvidia 275.xx versions. Since Ubuntu 11.04 came with support for the 270.xx series, your Nvidia card will not be detected or at least not work correctly (Not fully work). Your only solution is to use the one from the Nvidia Site (Not recommended) or to use one from one of the Nvidia PPA maintained for Ubuntu (The PPAs that offer Nvidia, Ati and Intel updated packages are the x-swat and xorg-edgers PPA). This only applies to 11.04. For 11.10 and above it works correctly (Except in some situations provided below) since the 275.xx drivers had already appeared by then.

Read moreGUIDE: Which drivers to install when using an Nvidia, ATI or Intel video card on Ubuntu

The #Tor Guide for Hidden Services And Staying #Anonymous

Thank you for viewing the guide. All the links I posted are safe for viewing, as I stated. Please remember to use Tor with caution. DO not use any of your identities or names. Make a new one if necessary.
Most child porn sites are openly advertised. Memorize the beginning of certains links to know where to go and where not to. Do not stray into a domain you do not recognize. Ask an Onionland community that you trust beforehand.

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Because location-hidden services do not use exit nodes, they are not subject to exit node eavesdropping.
You can NOT GET V& using Hidden Services because Hidden Services run internally and do not require exit nodes. The only people who have gotten sniffed are the people who downloaded a fake version of Tor. Anonymous sniffed who went to Loli City and Hard Candy and wrote down their real IPs. I just want to clear this up. All traffic inside the network is encrypted. If you use the clearnet, you are using exit nodes, and you can be subject to suffering an attack. Most clearnet providers are perfectly safe. The majority are run by really cool guys who just want to help you browse the web with liberty. Don’t be stupid in Onionland. You’re only as safe as you’re weakest link.
UPDATE: For further discussion on potential Tor exploits or security faults, read this: http://zw3crggtadila2sg.onion/imageboard/fbi/res/481.html. Use Tor to connect to it.

For a secure environment, use Tails or Liberte as an OS. They’re a variation of Linux and perfect for Tor browsing. Windows security is an oxymoron; if you must use it, download an anti-virus. I suggest Kaspersky. You can also get Keyscrambler Pro from 1337x.org. It’s a great tool to prevent keylogging.

Read moreThe #Tor Guide for Hidden Services And Staying #Anonymous

Full Disk Encryption Using Ubuntu In Most Secure Mode With AES-XTS-PLAIN64

Full Disk Encryption (FDE) is one of the best ways you can ensure all of the private information on your laptop stays private in case it’s lost, seized, stolen, or if you choose to sell or give away your computer in the future. This feature has been built-in to many GNU/Linux distributions, including Ubuntu, for many years. But until the recent release of Ubuntu 12.10, it was hidden away in the “alternate” text-mode installer of Ubuntu that many non-technical users don’t even know exists.
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Unlike passwords, full disk encryption can make the contents of a drive inaccessible to a powerful attacker who has possession of your computer. FDE provides the opportunity to protect your data with military-grade encryption that can’t be compromised on a reasonable timeframe. At least, not by any currently-known means. The only way to access the files protected by full disk encryption is to obtain the encryption key.
AES-XTS provides the most secure mode of full disk encryption. Unfortunately, it’s not available by default in many Linux installation packages. Ubuntu’s “alternate” installation image provides other implementations like AES-CBC, but not aes-xts-plain or aes-xts-plain64. If aes-cbc is good enough for you, it’s been available in the Ubuntu alternate installer for quite some time. A thorough but dated guide outlining the process is available here.
By downloading an Ubuntu desktop installation image and doing a little initial setup, you can use aes-xts-plain64 on your system. Aes-xts-plain and aes-xts-plain64 both provide the same mode of operation, but you’ll need to use aes-xts-plain64 if you want to format a partition larger than 2TB. Also, it’s important to note that using very large block sizes for XTS mode could lead to security issues. Using 512 byte block sizes mitigates this issue.

Read moreFull Disk Encryption Using Ubuntu In Most Secure Mode With AES-XTS-PLAIN64