Reasons To Ditch Windows For Linux

Linux, sometimes referred to by the press as ‘Windows NT’s worst enemy’. Wired Magazine once called it ‘The greatest story never told’. This is a perfect definition because the story behind Linux is indeed a great one, yet it is unknown to so many people.
Let’s start at the beginning.

Back when ‘Stayin’ Alive’ was still topping the charts, and Microsoft was a spec in the world of computers, AT&T produced a multi-user operating system and labeled it ‘UNIX’. Throughout the years, UNIX caught on and many different versions of it began to come out. A popular one, called ‘Minix’ (mini-UNIX) was available for use at The University of Helsinki in Finland. A student at the University named Linus Torvalds believed he could create an operating system superior to Minix. In 1991 he started his new operating system as a side project, but it soon developed into a full-time hobby until 1994 when the first official version of the operating system was released.

Linux is Easier than Windows – Even your grandma should use it!

You’re probably now saying ‘so what’s the big deal about Linux? Isn’t it just another operating system?’ Absolutely not! First of all, Linux is released under something called ‘open source license’. Open source is really more of an idea than a thing. Linux is released with all the source code and files that it was made with. This means a few things. Anyone who is good at programming can mess with the Linux code and release his own version of it. This also means that even though if you buy Linux in a store it will cost money, you’re not paying for the actual Linux itself. Your money goes to the price of packaging, the extra software that comes with the operating system, and technical support. The second, and most important reason that Linux is a big deal is because it’s a much more stable operating system than Windows. It runs on any system; even bottom of the line 386’s from before Linux even came out. Programs running under Linux almost never crash, and in the off chance that one does because of bad programming by the program author, it will not take the operating system down with it. Another important reason Linux is good is that it is secure. It is much harder to bring down by a hacker than Windows is. This is just an extremely short list of the reasons why Linux is so great. For further reading check out.

Today Linux can stand toe-to-toe with the best that Microsoft has to offer and there are at least five reasons to make the switch. In addition to the five below, Linux runs on fewer machines and therefore ends up with fewer viruses and malware as compared to Windows.

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Essential Information Security Tools

Software companies reap the most benefits from the rise of automated ethical hacking tools and penetration testing utilities, giving them more ways to increase system security every day.

Automated tools are changing the way hacking is evolving, making ethical penetration testing easier, faster and more reliable than ever. Penetration testing and reporting activities now play a crucial role in the process of identifying security flaws in remote or local software enabling company owners to quickly prevent vulnerabilities from running wild all over the Internet.

Most infosec forensics investigators walk a fine line. They must adhere to specific institutional processes, which, in many cases, are state and federal requirements. But they must also use a certain amount of pragmatism since no two investigations are exactly alike.

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The only Linux antivirus! Steps to install ClamAV in Linux.

Many of the popular Windows antivirus programs have a Linux equivalent (F-Secure, Sophos, ESET NOD32, Comodo, F-PROT). But more often than not these do little more than scan for signatures of Windows viruses. This doesn’t mean they should be disregarded outright!

If you use Wine to run Windows programs then you could inadvertently use it to run Windows malware. Also, if you run an email server then it’s absolutely in your interests to scan incoming messages for Windows threats. Even if you don’t, maybe you’d rather know if that file you can’t remember downloading contains a Windows nasty, and maybe you’d feel safer scanning it from Linux.

Your desktop might not need it, but Linux has antivirus software too.

We’re going to look at what appears to be the only open source antivirus software, ClamAV.

Many popular Linux distributions include a nearly latest up-to-date version of ClamAV on repositories, or you can compile it yourself if you’re feeling brave enough. But generally speaking you’re also fine with an older version since it will still download up-to-date virus database definitions.

Read moreThe only Linux antivirus! Steps to install ClamAV in Linux.

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Fallout 4 fixes in Linux/SteamPlay

Howdy, since there are lots of people asking for help for issues such as mouse instability in the game Fallout4 on Steam with Linux/SteamPlay. Here’s a solutions that worked on several Linux distro’s i’ve have tested. Fix nr 1. Mouse Inaccuracy: If you have the game Fallout 4 installed, now navigate to following path: /home/<users>/.steam/steam/steamapps/compatdata/377160/pfx/drive_c/users/steamuser/My … Read more Fallout 4 fixes in Linux/SteamPlay

Linux distributions in Day-to-Day Life

There are a few terms that may confuse Linux beginners. The first thing is its name, Linux vs GNU/Linux, the term Linux refers to the Linux kernel only. In reality many users refer to Linux as the operating system as a whole, the kernel plus libraries and tools. Also the term Linux is used to include all the programs that run on Linux, or that are available for this great operating system.
Furthermore, the description GNU/Linux needs understanding. Linux distributions with this name prefix are fleshed out with GNU implementations of the system tools and programs. One such example is Debian GNU/Linux. The GNU project goes back to the initiative of Richard M. Stallman and his dream to develop a free UNIX system. Based on his experiences at MIT and the collaboration with other colleagues he choose to use free software that was already available to rewrite the tools he needed. This included the TeX typesetting system as well as X11 window system. He published the rewritten tools under the GPL license whenever possible to make his work available freely to everyone who was interested in it.

Popular Linux Distributions
Popular Linux Distributions

A Linux distribution is a collection of software packages that fit together. A distribution is maintained by a team of software developers. Each member of the team focuses on a different package of the distribution. Together as a team they ensure that the single software packages are up-to-date and do not conflict with the other packages of the same release of the distribution.
As of 2019 for Debian GNU/Linux 10, the distribution includes over 13,370 new packages, for a total of over 57,703 packages. A repository is a directory of packages with a certain purpose. Debian GNU/Linux sorts its packages according to the development state. The official repository is named stable and reflects the current release of stable packages. The other repositories are named testing and unstable, and work in the same way but do not count as official packages.
Typically a Linux distribution comprises of packages for a Linux kernel, a boot loader, GNU tools and libraries, a graphical desktop environment with a windows environment, as well as additional software like a web browser, an email client, databases and documentation. The software is provided in two ways; as the source code and as the compiled binary packages. This allows you to understand how the software is designed, to study it and to adjust it according to your personal needs.

Depending on the focus of the Linux distribution, it also contains packages for a specific purpose like network or forensic tools, scientific software for educational purposes, and multimedia applications.

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Memory Footprint of Processes

The amount of memory your system needs depends on the memory
requirements of the programs you run. Do you want to know how
to figure that out? It’s not as simple as adding up the amount of
memory used by each process individually, because some of that
memory can be shared. Read on to learn the details below.

One thing you should know about /proc/meminfo: This is not a real file. Instead /pro/meminfo is a virtual file that contains real-time, dynamic information about the system.

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Refreshing the /boot

Every three months once kernel team releasing new stable kernel which comes with new features, Improved Hardware & System Performance. At least monthly once we will get kernel patch/update from operating system for varies fix. For best practices, i would advice users to install all the updates regularly to make the system up and running without any issue.

And /boot partition sometimes needs a bit of that attention. If you enable automatic
updates, it will fill up with old kernels that you’ll probably never need. It also will stop
you from running dnf (Dandified Packaging Tool) to install or remove anything. If you find yourself in this
situation, you can use rpm to get around it. RPM is the higher-level package manager
in Red-Hat-based distributions, and it’s very useful when dnf has “broken”.

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Tail: End of file revealed

Tail is a core application of Unix-based systems, designed to read the end of text files. It can also be used for something else called piped-data too, but we’ll touch on that later (let’s not complicate things just yet!).
Although “reading the end of a file” sounds pretty self-explanatory, tail is a chief tool in any expert’s arsenal, with many practical uses we’ll explore along the way.

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Playing Grand Theft Auto V (Steam) on Linux without struggle

Howdy Linux gamer’s, since the release of Steam Play in Augustus playing Windows triple-A games on Linux became simplicity. Except for GTA5, getting it working on Steam it isnt that easy, lots of tweaking is required as seen in this GTA 5’s compatibility list.

Linux Gaming in growing

Well for those who still did not gave up the hope, here’s a tutorial for getting GTA5 fully playable on your beloved Linux distro. because it works perfectly on mine Fedora!

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Detect malicious traffic with MalTrail in Linux

Maltrail is a malicious traffic detection system, utilizing publicly available (black)lists containing malicious and/or generally suspicious trails, along with static trails compiled from various AV reports and custom user defined lists, where trail can be anything from domain name, URL, IP address or HTTP User-Agent header value (e.g. sqlmap for automatic SQL injection and database takeover tool). Also, it uses (optional) advanced heuristic mechanisms that can help in discovery of unknown threats (e.g. new malware).
Features

  • Uses multiple public blacklists (alientvault, autoshun, badips, sblam etc)
  • Has extensive static trails for identification (domain names, URLs, IPaddresses or User-Agent values)
  • Optional heuristic mechanisms for detection of unknown threats
  • Based on Traffic -> Sensor <-> Server <-> Client Architecture
  • Web reporting interface

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